Hoping to find some of the most beautiful waterfalls in Japan? Well, good news! As you might have noticed from Japan’s “Three Great Festivals of Edo,” “Three Great Gardens,” “Three Great Views” or “Three Great Ramens,” this country loves to find the best of the best, and today we’re looking at the very best of waterfalls in Japan. The Three Great Waterfalls are three unique falls in three different prefectures of Japan, so take a look at what makes each one special!

1. Nachi Falls, Wakayama

The water at Nachi Falls in Wakayama Prefecture shoots off the cliff and down the rock from 133…


Many travelers come to Japan to climb Mount Fuji during the warm summer months, but few people know that you can actually go under the mountain as well! Mount Fuji is an active volcano, and when it erupted back in the year 864, the huge lava flows divided lakes, paved new flatlands, and even created a number of lava tubes, which remain to this day in the form of caves under the mountainside. Several of these remaining caves are still accessible from Aokigahara Forest, and have been declared Natural Monuments of Japan thanks to their unique geological features. …


While most travelers tend to travel straight from Narita Airport to central Tokyo, lately the Japankuru team has been exploring the area around the airport (which is actually in Chiba Prefecture), to report back on some of the best sightseeing spots close by! Not so long ago, we wrote all about nearby Boso no Mura, an open-air museum of old Japanese buildings with traditional crafting workshops and retro Japanese dress-up, as well as the samurai houses in Sakura, where you can walk bamboo-lined paths while cosplaying as a samurai. …


① Soba Classes in Tendo, Yamagata

Soba noodles are defined by one ingredient: buckwheat (AKA soba), and the northern reaches of Japan are covered with endless fields of the crop. So when it comes to “soba-uchi taiken” (そば打ち体験, soba cooking classes), Japan’s northern Tohoku Region is a great place to start!

Tendo is a city in the prefecture of Yamagata, known for snowy winters, beautiful views, and decades of shogi (Japanese chess) manufacturing. It’s also home to Tendo Kogen Family Land (天童高原ファミリーランド), which offers hands-on soba noodle cooking classes.


Hokkaido and Its Many Landscapes

Hokkaido is one of the biggest islands that makes up the country of Japan, but thanks to its location in the northernmost reaches of the country, and a history of native peoples and culture, a trip to Hokkaido is bound to be a unique experience! Sapporo, the capital of Hokkaido Prefecture, is known for beer and a yearly Snow Festival, but that’s not all Hokkaido has to offer. Here are nine more reasons to spend some time on the island of Hokkaido!

01. Sapporo TV Tower

This 147.2m (483ft) TV Tower was built in 1957 and sits in the heart of Sapporo, with an…


Over the years, whisky has become increasingly popular in Japan, as domestic Japanese distilleries have refined their processes and their products, and the highball (whisky soda) has become a staple of Japanese businessmen after a long day of work. Popular culture has caught on, and in recent years, the story of whisky has even become the topic of a popular Japanese TV show. …


See the Sunrise First at Inubosaki Lighthouse

With warm weather arriving in Tokyo, the sun and the sea are calling to us all, and people are starting to head to some of the most popular beaches around Tokyo. Many Tokyoites flock to the Shonan Coast or the Boso Peninsula, which is even used as a common setting in Japanese films and TV, but those aren’t the only areas nearby with beautiful beachy views!

Chiba’s city of Choshi is known for its cute local railway, the Choshi Electric Railway, but it’s also the location of Inubosaki (犬吠埼), sometimes called Cape Inubo. This cape pokes out into the Pacific…


Fueki Soy Sauce Brewing & Kinbue Shoyu Park

How do little beige soybeans become fragrant brown soy sauce? The Fueki family have been brewing soy sauce for 230 years and 12 generations, and now they’re letting everyone in on the secrets of “shoyu” (醤油, soy sauce, sometimes written “syoyu”) at the Kinbue Shoyu Park in the town of Kawajima, Saitama Prefecture. Formed around the still-functional Kinbue Soy Sauce brewery buildings, some of which have been used to make soy sauce for over 100 years, Kinbue Shoyu Park is a unique travel destination where visitors can learn all about the brewing process at “Soy Sauce School,” see the brewing…


Japan has been growing grapes for more than 1,000 years, possibly starting back in the 8th century, but fermenting those grapes into wine is a newer phenomenon. In the 16th century, Portuguese Jesuit missionaries started bringing their own wine to the feudal lords of Kyushu down south, and up north in Fukushima, the daimyo Gamo Ujisato is said to be the first to drink red wine in Japan around the same time. …


Otaru was once a busy port city, known to some as “the gateway to Hokkaido,” with bustling docks and a functional canal, lined with warehouses used to store goods on their way in and out of the city. In modern times, the frenetic energy of ships passing through to load and unload merchandise has moved elsewhere, to more modern dock facilities elsewhere in the region, and Otaru has become a laid-back favorite of sightseers in Hokkaido. Nowadays travelers stroll through Otaru enjoying the fresh seafood caught nearby, and the beautifully preserved old buildings around the city.

1. Otaru Canal (小樽運河)

JAPANKURU

Meaning "come to Japan", we‘re an international group working to introduce Japan to the world from as many interesting angles as we can find.

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